Yuck-O-Meter

Yuck report

PediaSure: A source of complete, balanced nutrition to help fill the holes in your® picky eater’s diet.

"Yucky" FoodWhat Your Child Is Missing and Why It's ImportantTry One of These Instead
Crackers CrackersCarbohydrates are the most readily available and most efficient form of fuel used by the body. Carbohydrates are the first form of calories that are burned for energy. Talk to your healthcare provider about the right amount of calories for your child.Food guidelines recommend that at least half of grain foods, such as bread, contain whole grains. To replace missing carbohydrates in your child's diet, try carbohydrate containing foods, such as whole-grain pita chips, low-fat tortilla chips, or whole-grain wheat crackers.
Tomatoes TomatoesVitamin A plays a role in vision and promotes cell differentiation, and the plant form of vitamin A supports immune function.

Vitamin C has many roles in your child's body. It acts as an antioxidant, works in collagen formation to keep bones and teeth strong, assists in hormone production, helps strengthen the immune system, and helps in iron absorption.
To replace missing vitamin A in your child's diet, try other foods that are high in vitamin
A, such as carrots, cooked sweet potatoes, cooked broccoli or tomato sauce or juice.

To replace the vitamin C that might be missing from a diet without tomatoes, try cooked broccoli, oranges, fresh strawberries, raw red or yellow peppers, or 1/2 cup of tomato sauce or juice.
Green Peppers Green PeppersVitamin A plays a role in vision and promotes cell differentiation, and the plant form of vitamin A supports immune function.

Vitamin C has many roles in your child's body. It acts as an antioxidant, works in collagen formation to keep bones and teeth strong, assists in hormone production, helps strengthen the immune system, and helps in iron absorption.
To replace missing vitamin A in your child's diet, try other foods that are high in vitamin A, such as carrots, cooked sweet potatoes, cooked broccoli, or tomato sauce or juice.

To replace the vitamin C that might be missing from a diet without green peppers, try cooked broccoli, oranges, fresh strawberries, red or yellow peppers, or 1/2 cup of tomato sauce or juice.
Bread BreadCarbohydrates are the most readily available and most efficient form of fuel used by the body. Carbohydrates are the first form of calories that are burned for energy. Carbohydrate sources such as bread also contain many vitamins and minerals, as well as fibre. Talk to your healthcare provider about the right amount of calories for your child.

Folate is essential for brain and spinal cord development as well as the formation of new cells, which is essential for growing children.
Food guidelines recommend that at least half of grain foods, such as bread, contain whole grains. To replace carbohydrates that might be missing from a diet without bread, try carbohydrate containing foods, such as fortified ready-to-eat cereal, pasta, brown rice; wraps; or low-fat crackers.

To replace folate that your child is missing from not eating bread, try folic acid fortified foods such as whole-grain breakfast cereal, pasta, or rice.
Cheese CheeseCalcium helps build bones and teeth. It is involved in muscle contraction and relaxation, nerve functioning, blood pressure, blood clotting, and immune defenses.

Protein is important in the promotion of muscle tissue cell growth and development in children.

Fat has many important roles in the body. It plays a role in hormonal balance, transporting vitamins, providing energy, and building cell structures.
To replace calcium that might be missing in your child's diet if he or she does not like cheese, try other foods that are high in calcium, such as 2% milk (full-fat milk for under age 2), low-fat yoghurt or pudding, calcium fortified orange juice, calcium set tofu, or broccoli.

To replace protein in your child's diet, try other foods that are rich in protein, such as low-fat mozzarella or cheddar cheese, egg, peanut butter, low-fat yoghurt, lean meat or fish.

If needed, replace the fat in your child's diet if he or she does not like cheese with low-fat cheddar or other types of cheese, nuts or peanut butter, or vegetable oil based salad dressings.
Broccoli BroccoliVitamin A plays a role in vision and promotes cell differentiation, and the plant form of vitamin A helps support immune function.

Vitamin C has many roles in your child's body. It acts as an antioxidant, works in collagen formation to keep bones and teeth strong, assists in hormone production, helps strengthen the immune system, and helps in iron absorption.

Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting.
To replace missing vitamin A in your child's diet, try other foods that are high in vitamin A, such as carrots, cooked sweet potatoes, spinach, or tomato sauce or juice.

To replace the vitamin C that might be missing from a diet without broccoli, try cooked asparagus, raw red or yellow peppers, or tomato sauce or juice.

To replace the vitamin K that might be missing from a diet without broccoli, try other foods with vitamin K, such as raw, leafy green vegetables; raw or cooked cabbage; or spinach.
Eggs EggsProtein is important in the promotion of muscle tissue cell growth and development in children.

Iron is essential in transporting oxygen in the blood. It is also important in muscle protein and immune function.

Zinc supports protein functioning in the body, helps the immune system work, and is a key component to growth and development in kids.
To replace protein in your child's diet, try other foods that are rich in protein, such as low-fat cheese, peanut butter, lean meat, poultry or fish, or low-fat yoghurt.
To replace iron in your child's diet, try other foods containing iron, such as red meat, fish or poultry, or iron-fortified foods, such as iron-fortified egg substitutes.
To replace zinc in your child's diet, try alternative foods that are high in zinc, including red meat, fish or poultry, whole-grain cereals, or zinc fortified cereals.
Almonds AlmondsVitamin E is an antioxidant that works to stabilize cell membranes in children's bodies.

Magnesium is involved in making children's bones strong, building protein tissues, immune functioning, and many other important tasks.

Potassium is essential in maintaining fluid and electrolyte balance in the body. It also is a key player in digestion.
To replace vitamin E in your child's diet if your child does not enjoy almonds, try other foods that are rich in vitamin E, such as vegetable oils (olive, canola, and other seed based oils), dry sunflower seeds or cashew nuts, or peanut butter.

To replace magnesium that might be missing if your child does not like almonds, try other foods that are high in magnesium, such as whole grains, sunflower seeds, cashew nuts, or raw, leafy green vegetables.

To replace potassium in your child's diet if he or she does not like almonds, try bananas, dried fruit such as raisins, or cooked legumes or beans.
Strawberries StrawberriesVitamin C has many roles in your child's body. It acts as an antioxidant, works in collagen formation to keep bones and teeth strong, assists in hormone production, helps strengthen the immune system, and helps in iron absorption.

Folate is essential for brain and spinal cord development as well as the formation of new cells, which is essential for growing children.

Potassium is essential in maintaining fluid and electrolyte balance in the body. It also is a key player in digestion.
To replace the vitamin C that might be missing from a diet without strawberries, try oranges, naartjies, watermelon, or fortified juice.

To replace folate that your child is missing from not eating strawberries, try fortified whole-grain products (breakfast cereal, pasta, and rice), or fruit naturally containing folate, such as oranges or orange juice.

To replace potassium in your child's diet if he or she does not like strawberries, try bananas, oranges, or watermelon.
Grapes GrapesCarbohydrates are the most readily available and most efficient form of fuel used by the body. Carbohydrates are the first form of calories that are burned for energy.
Carbohydrate foods such as grapes are associated with many vitamins and nutrients, as well as fibre. Talk to your healthcare provider about the right amount of calories for your child.

Vitamin C has many roles in your child's body. It acts as an antioxidant, works in collagen formation to keep bones and teeth strong, assists in hormone production, helps strengthen the immune system, and helps in iron absorption.
To replace carbohydrates that might be missing in a diet without grapes, you might wish to try other fruits such as bananas, apples, pears, raisins, or grape juice.

To replace the vitamin C that might be missing from a diet without grapes, try oranges, watermelon, strawberries, or fortified juice.
Chicken ChickenProtein is important in the promotion of muscle tissue cell growth and development in children.

Niacin is used in energy metabolism (breaking down carbohydrates, protein, and fat into energy). In your child, it supports the health of skin, the nervous system, and the digestive system.
To replace protein in your child's diet, try other foods that are rich in protein, such as lean beef, or fish; cheese; peanut butter; or low-fat yoghurt.

To replace niacin that might be missing in your child's diet if he or she does not eat chicken, try beef, turkey, fish, shrimp, or tuna.
Carrots CarrotsVitamin A plays a role in vision and promotes cell differentiation, and the plant form of vitamin A supports immune function.

Vitamin C has many roles in your child's body. It acts as an antioxidant, works in collagen formation to keep bones and teeth strong, assists in hormone production, helps strengthen the immune system, and helps in iron absorption.

Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting.
To replace missing vitamin A in your child's diet without carrots, try other foods that are high in vitamin A, such as broccoli, cooked sweet potatoes, pumpkin, winter squash, greens (such as kale, and spinach), or tomato sauce or juice.

To replace the vitamin C that might be missing from a diet without carrots, try asparagus, oranges, fresh strawberries, raw red or yellow pepper, or tomato sauce or juice.

To replace the vitamin K that might be missing from a diet without carrots, try other foods, such as cabbage, dark green vegetables (such as spinach), or eggs.
Fish FishProtein is important in the promotion of muscle tissue cell growth and development in children.

Selenium is an antioxidant that works in the immune system with vitamin E to prevent oxidative cell damage.

Omega3 fatty acids are "good fats" that play important roles in your child's body. They support brain and eye development.
To replace protein in your child's diet if he or she does not like fish, try other foods that are rich in protein, such as red meat, poultry, cheese, or low-fat yoghurt.

To provide your child with selenium if his or her diet does not include fish, other foods that are good sources of selenium include red meat, poultry, or eggs. Brazil nuts also contain a high amount of selenium.

To replace omega3 fatty acids in your child's diet, choose other foods high in omega3 fatty acids, such as soy, canola, or flaxseed oil (in cooking oils or salad dressings), walnuts (in baked goods), or fish sources such as tuna, salmon, or other fatty fish.
Bananas BananasIn your child, Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) is a key player in making red blood cells. It is also important in protein and fat metabolism.

Vitamin C has many roles in the body. It acts as an antioxidant, works in collagen formation to keep bones and teeth strong, assists in hormone production, helps strengthen the immune system, and helps in iron absorption.

Potassium is essential in maintaining fluid and electrolyte balance in the body. It also is a key player in the process of digestion.
To replace the vitamin B6 that your child might be missing from not consuming bananas, try other sources, such as avocados, dried fruit (raisins, dates, figs, or prunes), or whole-grain ready-to-eat cereals.

To replace the vitamin C that might be missing from a diet without bananas, try oranges, watermelon, strawberries, or fortified juice.

To replace potassium in your child’s diet if he or she does not like bananas, try apricots, pears, nectarines, peaches, cantaloupes, honeydew melons, oranges, or watermelon.
OatmealOatmealIn your child, vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) is a key player in making red blood cells. It is also important in protein and fat metabolism.

Iron is essential in transporting oxygen in the blood. It is also important in muscle protein and immune function.

Carbohydrates are the most readily available and most efficient form of fuel used by the body. Carbohydrates are the first form of calories that are burned for energy. Carbohydrate foods, such as oatmeal, are associated with many vitamins and nutrients, as well as fibre.

Talk to your healthcare provider about the right amount of calories for your child.
To replace the vitamin B6 that your child might be missing from not consuming oatmeal, try other sources, such as whole-grain ready-to-eat cereals (wheat flakes, raisin bran, and shredded wheat), brown rice, or other whole grains.

To replace iron in your child’s diet, try other foods that are rich in iron, such as iron-enriched whole-grain bread, bagels, waffles, cereals, or pasta.

Food guidelines recommend that at least half of grain foods (such as bread) contain whole grains. To replace carbohydrates, choose whole-grain choices such as fortified ready-to-eat cereal, pasta, or brown rice; wraps; or low-fat crackers.
Corn on the cob MieliesThiamin is important in making the energy in food (carbohydrates) available for energy in the body (glucose).

Folate is essential for brain and spinal cord
development as well as the formation of new
cells, essential for growing children.
To replace the thiamin in your child’s diet, choose other foods with high thiamin content, such as green peas, dried beans (such as kidney beans), nuts and seeds such as sunflower seeds or peanuts, or enriched ready-to-eat cereals.

To replace folate that your child is missing from not eating mielies, try other foods containing natural folate, such as dark green vegetables (broccoli, romaine, or other dark green lettuce) or fruit naturally containing folate, such as oranges or orange juice.
WafflesWafflesCarbohydrates are the most readily available and most efficient form of fuel used by the body. Carbohydrates are the first form of calories that are burned for energy.
Carbohydrate foods, such as enriched waffles, are associated with many vitamins and nutrients, as well as fibre. Talk to your healthcare provider about the right amount of calories for your child.

In your child, Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) is a key player in making red blood cells. It is also important in protein and fat metabolism.
Food guidelines recommend that at least half of grain foods, such as bread, contain whole grains. To replace carbohydrates that your child might be missing in his or her diet without waffles, choose whole-grain bread, fortified ready-to-eat or hot cereal, or whole-grain crackers.

To replace the vitamin B6 that your child is missing from not eating waffles, try other food sources, such as whole-grain bread, or fortified, ready-to-eat or hot cereal.
Milk MilkCalcium helps build strong bones and teeth for your growing child. Vitamin D helps to support calcium and phosphorus absorption. Emerging science shows that it assists in a variety of hormone-related functions.

Protein helps build lean muscle for your growing child.
To replace the calcium in your child's diet, try other foods with high calcium content, such as 2% chocolate milk (full-fat chocolate milk for children under 2), low-fat yoghurt or pudding, soy milk, or low-fat cheese.

To replace the vitamin D that your child is missing without milk, try other foods fortified with vitamin D such as orange juice, low-fat cheese, breakfast cereals, low-fat yoghurt, or eggs from hens fed vitamin D.

To replace the protein that your child is missing without milk in the diet, try other foods containing protein, such as low-fat cheese or yoghurt; lean chicken, turkey, or beef ; peanut butter or other legumes; or fish.
Apples ApplesVitamin C has many roles in the body. It acts as an antioxidant, works in collagen formation to keep bones and teeth strong, assists in hormone production, helps strengthen the immune system, and helps in iron absorption.

Carbohydrates are the most readily available and most efficient form of fuel used by the body. Carbohydrates are the first form of calories that are burned for energy. Carbohydrate foods, such as apples, are associated with many vitamins and nutrients, as well as fibre. Talk to your healthcare provider about the right amount of calories for your child.
To replace the vitamin C that might be missing from a diet without apples, try oranges, watermelon, strawberries, or fortified juice.

To replace carbohydrates that might be missing in your child’s diet without apples, choose pears, bananas, raisins, or fortified juice.
Pretzels PretzelsCarbohydrates are the most readily available and most efficient form of fuel used by the body. Carbohydrates are the first form of calories that are burned for energy. Talk to your healthcare provider about the right amount of calories for your child.

Folate is essential for brain and spinal cord development, as well as the formation of new cells.
Food guidelines recommend that at least half of grain foods (such as bread) contain whole grains. To replace carbohydrates in your child’s diet if pretzels are not consumed, try whole-grain pita chips or crackers, or corn tortilla chips.

To replace folate that your child is missing, try other foods containing natural folate or other folic-acid-fortified foods, such as fortified whole-grain products (such as breakfast cereal, pasta, cereal, and rice).
Hamburgers HamburgersCarbohydrates are the most readily available and most efficient form of fuel used by the body. Carbohydrates are the first form of calories that are burned for energy. Talk to your healthcare provider about the right amount of calories for your child.

Protein is important in the promotion of muscle tissue cell growth and development in children.

Fat has many important roles in the body. It plays a role in hormonal balance, transporting vitamins, providing energy, and building cell structures.
Food guidelines recommend that at least half of grain foods (such as bread) contain whole grains. To replace carbohydrates that might be missing in your child’s diet without a hamburger bun, try whole-grain bread, whole-wheat English muffins, corn tortillas, or Fibre-containing wraps.

To replace protein in your child’s diet, try other foods that are rich in protein, such as a vegetarian burger patty, turkey or chicken burger, or cheese.

If needed, replace the fat in your child's diet with low-fat cheddar or other types of cheese, nuts or peanut butter, or vegetable oil-based salad dressings.
Cereal CerealCarbohydrates are the most readily available and most efficient form of fuel used by the body. Carbohydrates are the first form of calories that are burned for energy. Talk to your healthcare provider about the right amount of calories for your child.

Protein is important in the promotion of muscle tissue cell growth and development in children.
To replace carbohydrates that might be missing in your child’s diet without cereal, try whole-grain waffles with fresh fruit and yoghurt, whole-grain pancakes with raisins and chocolate milk, or instant oatmeal prepared with milk and dried apricots.

To replace protein in your child’s diet if he or she does not care for cereal and milk, try other foods that are rich in protein, such as low-fat yoghurt or soy milk or 2% chocolate milk (full-fat chocolate milk for children under 2 years old).
Tips for Encouraging Your Child to try New Foods
  • Be a positive role model. Eat the foods you want your child to eat. And make meals and snacks enjoyable with good conversation and a relaxed mood.
  • Avoid labeling your child. Instead of saying, “My child doesn’t like broccoli.” say “My child is great at trying new foods.” If you identify your child as someone who doesn’t like certain foods, he or she will believe himself or herself to be picky, which makes it difficult to accept new things.
  • Keep trying! It may take 10 or more tries for your child to accept new foods. Keep putting one bite of a challenging food on your child’s plate, and praise him or her for small tastes.
  • Make sure there is at least one thing you know your child likes to eat at every meal or snack. Let your picky eater help make decisions at meals, such as choosing side dishes. Giving some control to your child empowers him or her to feel confident about trying new foods.
  • Get your child involved with meals and snacks. Children as young as two can help set the table, wash produce, and prepare a recipe. Most kids will eat something they helped make!
  • If you are concerned about your child’s diet, speak with a registered dietitian or your pediatrician to see if a child supplement such as PediaSure can help. PediaSure is great to use as a supplement with or between meals to help fill nutritional gaps in your child’s diet.

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